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Something Innate and Seemingly Eternal: An Interview with Glyn Smyth

Posted by darkartandcraft Admin on

Dark Art & Craft recently had a chance to talk with Belfast, Northern Ireland-based artist and printmaker Glyn Smyth. Smyth utilizes Art Nouveau stylings and realistic rendering to bring his esoteric themes to life. We have admired Smyth's album and print work for some time now and had a chance to discuss a few topics and themes with the artist.

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Ernst Ferdinand Oehme Dark Romanticism

Posted by darkartandcraft Admin on

Ernst Ferdinand Oehme was a German Romantic painter trained at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts. At the Academy Oehme trained under Danish painter Johan Christian Clausen Dahl whose friend Caspar David Friedrich greatly influenced the young artist. 

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Flesh & Bone, The Art of A. W. Sommers

Posted by Justin Meyers on

Allison Sommers is a self-taught visual artist working primarily in gouache on paper. The Brooklyn-based artist creates complicated, intricate, sometimes uncomfortable worlds of meat, vegetation, birds and beasts of various sizes. The artist describers herself as an Art worker, flaneur and vulgarist.  Sommers uses warm vibrant hues on paper to create her bizarre creatures and unravelling organs.

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Kris Kuksi Dark Relics & Lost Civilizations

Posted by Justin Meyers on

Kris Kuksi has been called a post-industrial Rococo and Fantastic Realism sculptor. Right? It can sound like a lot until you see his work. Kuksi obsessively places figures, small toys, mechanical components, objects and characters into an impressive often massive symmetrical composition.

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Gustave Doré, The Dark Divine Comedy

Posted by Justin Meyers on

A prolific and extremely talented wood and steel engraver, illustrator, and sculptor Gustave Doré created macabre Visions. Angels, demons, historical drama and human tragedy filled his detailed etchings. The Paradise Lost illustrations and Dante's Divine Comedy have become so praised that many have become macabre popular culture items in their own right. 

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